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Beaconsfield Primary School Masterplan

In 2013, Beaconsfield Primary School engaged CODA to develop an overall Masterplan for their campus, with a focus on its gardens and external play spaces. We were excited by the potentials of this project to create a series of spaces that align with the school’s aspirations to link culture, play and learning. With the assistance of the school community the transformation of the grounds has been able to take place at a rapid pace. Three derelict buildings have already been demolished in order to make room for a Nature Play playground as well as a Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden respledent with seasonal planting. This project provides the opportunity for everyone at CODA to contribute to the outcome through the range of skills and interests of our practice. Urban design, architecture and landscape architecture will all play a big role as we get into more detail.

SECCA Office

secca is a non-profit organisation designed to support people with disabilities, in their efforts to learn about human relationships, sexuality and sexual health across their lifespan. CODA were engaged to provide a schematic design for a new office fit out for secca, currently located in the City West Lotteries House in West Perth.

The proposal aspires to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for staff and visitors. The intent was to utilize warm tones and natural materials to create an inspiring workplace and an inviting, private and safe space for patients.

A plywood hood wraps around the office, providing much needed storage space for the staff of the organisation.

PMH Psychological Medicine Reception Area

In 2011, CODA were approached by the Psychological Medicine Department at Princess Margaret Hospital to improve their waiting space and shift it from the generic sofa and toddler toys that are typical of a hospital waiting space to something that engaged with the diversity of the users of the space.

The waiting area is constantly occupied and often requires children and adolescents to wait for up to an hour while their parent attends an appointment. Our initial brief development meetings with the client allowed us to experience firsthand the space and observe these users. The need for adolescents to have some independence from parents was immediately obvious.

The project had two major constraints that ultimately lead to the opportunities of the project.  Firstly the site area was extremely constrained and very little, if anything could be done to the fabric of the interior space. Secondly, the project had a total budget of $6000 including toys.

Through the removal of a single partition wall we were able to take over a small, disused space and create an L-shape to work within. The scheme itself inserts an object into the centre of this space, away from the walls, creating a continuous ribbon of activity that spans the range of ages of the client base whilst allowing for age appropriate levels of adult supervision.

Execution of this tiny project would not have been possible had it not been for the generosity and collaborative nature of the people who ultimately delivered it. Carpet and rubber were donated, ply was discounted and rooms were painted. The Subiaco Men in Sheds donated their time and over several weeks and in addition to the painting, tackled the complex geometries of the plywood modules and the necessity for on-site assembly.

This project reinforces the importance of architecture at every scale and the generosity of people to make a real difference through small, incremental improvements.

In July 2012, the PMH Psychological Medicine Reception Area received a Commendation in the Small Project category at the Australian Institute of Architects Awards (WA).

Horse Barn

Our pro bono program enables our entire practice to engage in voluntary work to assist community-based groups to pursue or complete projects for their organisation. This program helps strengthen social responsibility as a core value of our business.

In 2008 we heard that a residential drug and alcohol facility was looking to build a horse barn in order for their clients to help rehabilitate abused horses. We approached them to offer both our design and ‘construction’ services. We sought to reuse as many of the materials as we could from the farm itself and develop a construction system that could be executed by a group of enthusiastic but largely untrained ‘builders’.

The total budget for the project was $7000 or $25/m. The existing structure was largely maintained and strengthened. Steel tracks from a previous hydroponic tomato system were reused to provide the structural components for walls and barriers. Within these a system of painted panels were inserted creating spaces for grooming and training, as well as additional accommodation for other animals such as goats. Colours were selected for their capacity to be both uplifting and soothing for the residents. External cladding provides increased weather protection.

The project achieved a triple bottom line in sustainability objectives through extremely economical construction, recycling and adapting existing spaces and community and social interaction.

This project received a Small Projects Commendation at the 2009 AIA Awards.